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cannabis sativa seed oil drug test

As a healthcare professional, a common question that I receive when talking to patients and clients who are interested in incorporating the use of hemp products or hemp foods into their daily routine is:

Hemp-based foods and hemp body products commercially produced and sold in the United States are not legally allowed to contain the potentially psychoactive cannabinoid known as THC (Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol). If a laboratory-tested hemp product did happen to contain trace amounts of this compound, it would be in such small quantities that it would likely require exorbitant amounts of ingestion or use for it to even remotely begin to show up in the smallest amount on a drug test.

According to the research studies available, the answer to this is question is a resounding NO! Regular consumption or use of commercially made hemp foods (such as seeds, cooking oil, cereals, milk, granola) or hemp products (lotions, shampoos, lip balms, etc.) will not show a positive result for THC on a drug test.

“Will eating hemp foods show up positive for THC on a drug test?”

However, with that said, consuming non-commercially produced hemp foods, hemp-based oils, or using homemade hemp-based products may have risks to test positive. Non-federally regulated foods and products, like those purchased from a dispensary, farmer’s market, or even products bought online, do not necessarily follow any sort of federal food safety guidelines or food and drug administration regulations. When purchasing these types of hemp products, make sure you use caution and ask questions about how they were made and whether they were tested before being packaged.

The medical study selected for this article is conducted by a highly reputable scientific organization.

Hemp is not the same as marijuana. Hemp contains virtually no THC while marijuana may contain up to 30% THC by weight. Because hemp contains virtually no THC, it has been legal federally for farmers to grow since 2018. Additionally, hemp seed oil is the product of the pressed hemp seeds. If trace amounts of THC were to exist in a hemp plant, the THC would be found in the flower of the plant and not in the seeds. Even in high THC marijuana, THC is not found in the seeds of the plant.

Background

Hemp Seed Oil is used for pain relief, anxiety relief, cosmetic reasons, and as a dietary supplement. (5)

Drug tests screen urine, blood, or saliva samples for the presence of THC. THC is the psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana that gets people “high.” Commerical hemp-based food and beauty products are not legally allowed to contain THC.

The legal definition of hemp is really simple. If a cannabis plant has less than 0.3% THC, then it is legal federally and considered hemp.

A commercially available health food product of cold-pressed hemp seed oil ingested by one volunteer twice a day for 4 1/2 days (135 mL total). Urine specimens collected from the volunteer were subjected to standard workplace urine drug testing procedures, and the following concentrations of 11-nor-delta9- tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (9-THCA) were detected: 41 ng/mL 9-THCA at 45 h, 49 ng/mL at 69 h, and 55 ng/mL at 93 h. Ingestion was discontinued after 93 h, and the following concentrations were detected: 68 ng/mL at 108 h, 57 ng/mL at 117 h, 31 ng/mL at 126 h, and 20 ng/mL at 142 h. The first specimen that tested negative (50 ng/mL initial immunoassay test, 15 ng/mL confirmatory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric test) was at 146 h, which was 53 h after the last hemp seed oil ingestion. Four subsequent specimens taken to 177 h were also negative. This study indicates that a workplace urine drug test positive for cannabinoids may arise from the consumption of commercially available cold-pressed hemp seed oil.