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cannabis sativa seed oil effects

Understanding the differences between cannabis, hemp, and marijuana can be confusing because marijuana and hemp come from the same plant, Cannabis Sativa. The distinction is the variety of the plant. In the case of cannabis, the varieties differ in the amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that they contain. THC is the psychoactive constituent responsible for the high that cannabis gives. Hemp generally contains very little THC, so it has absolutely no psychoactive effects.

A natural antioxidant

What does Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil do for the skin?

Alongside a balanced ratio of essential fatty acids, one of the omega-6 fatty acids that hemp oil contains is gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), which simultaneously encourages skin growth and cell renewal. This can help to calm irritation on the skin, while keeping the skin intensively nourished, plumped and moisturised.

Hemp is a multi-purpose, multi-beneficial ingredient made from the pressed flowers, leaves, stalks and seeds of the Cannabis Sativa plant. Often cultivated for use in everything from agriculture, to food and beauty; hemp is most commonly known for its fibrous qualities and is frequently used in the production of clothing, textiles, and paper. Hemp oil and seeds also find their way into many foods as they are a rich source of omega fatty acids and essential nutrients.

There are buzzy skin-care ingredients (turmeric! probiotics!). And then there are skin-care ingredients with buzz. In the beautysphere right now, there’s nothing buzzier than hemp-derived ingredients, such as cannabis sativa seed oil. This type of oil is loaded with plenty of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are anti-inflammatory, next-level skin moisturizers.

We know, the science surrounding Cannabis in all of its many forms can get confusing. Here are the basics: There are more than 80 different cannabinoid compounds that can be extracted from the cannabis sativa plant (otherwise known as weed). Of these, the two compounds that are the most well-known are CBD and THC—the latter being the one that produces a high when you eat or smoke it (a.k.a. it makes you stoned). Although Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil is derived from the hemp plant—hemp oil comes from the seeds, while CBD is derived from the leaves—it doesn't contain any CBD or THC compounds, but it is naturally rich in many skin-smoothing, calming, and moisturizing properties.

So. what is Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil?

“Hemp seed oil is oil extracted from the hemp plant,” explains Joshua Zeichner, Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “Hemp seed oil is an outstanding natural oil for the skin,” Zeichner adds, which is precisely what makes it such a powerful skin care ingredient.

It's no surprise, then, that skin-care brands are betting big on ingredients from the hemp plant. Case in point: The new Green Releaf collection from Peter Thomas Roth, which includes the Therapeutic Sleep Cream and Calming Face Oil, both of which are infused with hemp-derived cannabis sativa seed oil.

Among the few human trials evaluating CBD’s anxiolytic effects was one published in the Brazilian Journal of Psychiatry in 2019. For this study, 57 men were given either CBD oil or a placebo before a public-speaking event. Anxiety was evaluated using physiological measures (such as blood pressure, heart rate, etc.) and a relatively reliable test for mood states known as the Visual Analog Mood Scale (VAMS).

CBD shows promise in the treatment of anxiety disorders, suggests a 2015 review of studies in the journal Neurotherapeutics.   According to the investigators, CBD demonstrated potent anxiolytic (anxiety-relieving) effects in animal research, albeit with counterintuitive results.

Addiction

Remember, because CBD oils are largely unregulated, there is no guarantee that a product is either safe or effective.

According to a 2012 study in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, rats injected with inflammatory chemicals in their hind feet experienced less inflammation and neuropathic pain when treated with an oral dose and spinal injection of CBD.  

Human studies evaluating the use of CBD in treating chronic pain are lacking. Those that do exist almost invariably include THC, making it difficult to isolate CBD’s distinct effects.