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cannabis seeds texas law

Cannabis oil has been legal since June 1, 2015, when Governor Greg Abbott signed the Texas Compassionate Use Act, which permits the use of low THC CBD oil to treat epilepsy in Texas. Abbott’s caveats his support: “I remain convinced that Texas should not legalize marijuana, it should only open the door to conventional marijuana for medicinal use. This followed a House of 96-34 vote on SB339.

Texas is often thought of as a hot country, associated with cacti and other desert-loving plants. However, its climate varies widely, from arid in the west to humid in the east. So what are the best varieties to try if you fancy growing some illicit weed – sorry hemp to treat epilepsy – in Texas?

Medical cannabis in Texas

Cannabis is illegal in Texas and has been since 1931. However, there is currently some confusion. In 2019, the Texan federal government decided that hemp could be legalized, although marijuana could not, even though they grow from the same plant. Basically, marijuana is the part that contains THC – still illegal – while hemp contains cannabinoids or CBD, which are popularly used for medicinal purposes. In 2019, hemp was legalized in Texas when the state legislature passed HB 1325. The law came into effect on June 10, 2019, making cannabis with less than 0.3% legal hemp as THC, while anything more important is considered marijuana.

Although heads of state are pushing for lawsuits, some Texans believe decriminalizing marijuana is the answer. Austin City Council member Greg Casar announced that he had a proposal for the city of Austin to stop prosecuting low-intensity marijuana cases. Mayor Pro Tem Delia Garza, Councilor Natasha Harper-Madison and Councilor Jimmy Flannigan also support the proposal. On January 23, the proposal will be presented to the Austin City Council meeting as agenda item 59.

In 2017, newly elected District Attorney Kim Ogg stated that Harris County would no longer jail people for cannabis possession offenses: “I never felt good to put marijuana users in cells. It’s just not fair, it doesn’t make sense, and our country is resounding against it.” Full decriminalization for possession of fewer than four ounces of cannabis began March 1, 2017, at no cost, ticketing, or criminal record.

Any sale to a minor is punishable by 2 – 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. Sale within 1,000 feet of a school or within 300 feet of a youth center, public pool or video arcade increases the penalty classification to the next highest level.

San Antonio NORML
1126 W. Mulberry
San Antonio, TX 78201
Phone: 210-837-1133
Contact: Heather Brockus
Email: [email protected]

* With no prior felony convictions, if convicted of possession of less than one pound of marijuana a judge must impose a sentence of probation with mandatory drug treatment. If no treatment center exists within the jurisdiction, the judge may waive the treatment requirement. They judge can also waive all fines.

The penalty for delivery, without remuneration, of one-quarter of an ounce or less is up to 180 days in jail and a fine up to $2,000. For delivery or sale of one-quarter of an ounce or less the penalty is up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $ 3,000. For delivery or sale of amounts greater than one-quarter ounce of marijuana the penalty increases to 180 days – 2 years in jail and a fine up to $10,000. Sale or delivery of greater than five pounds is punishable by 2 – 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. The penalty for delivery or sale of greater than 50 pounds is 5 – 99 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. For any amount of 2,000 pounds or greater, the penalty is a mandatory minimum 10 – 99 years in prison and a fine up to $100,000.

Repeat Misdemeanor Offenses:

Unfortunately for opponents of marijuana, the law was somewhat vague about where to draw the line between industrial hemp and other forms of cannabis. Faced with an inability to test at the required level of precision, police chiefs and prosecutors statewide started declining to press charges against people caught possessing hemp-like substances.

While things have been making a halting, mixed sort of progress on other fronts, the situation concerning marijuana seeds in Texas has not changed at all in recent years, and it has not had to. As in other states that do not specifically prohibit purchase or possession, it is entirely legal to buy and own marijuana seeds throughout Texas.

Even if many residents of Texas are still committed to keeping marijuana illegal, things are starting to change. Hoping to help farmers throughout the state, for example, Texas legislators in 2019 passed a bill meant to legalize the cultivation and sale of hemp.

Marijuana Seeds are Legal to Buy and Own Throughout Texas

The Lone Star State is famed worldwide for its sprawling size and brash character. Texas is also a conservative place, though, especially outside of major cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Austin.

The reason for this is simply that ungerminated marijuana seeds do not contain enough psychoactive THC to be considered drugs in their own right. Just like most other Americans, residents of Texas are therefore entitled to obtain and possess marijuana seeds for “souvenir purposes” or other personal reasons.

Since Texas arrests tens of thousands of people for marijuana-related crimes each year, any kind of progress is welcome. Even the Texas Republican Party’s official platform now calls for decriminalization of marijuana possession, a shift that would have been unthinkable not so long ago. For now, though, Texas remains mostly stuck in the past with regard to the official, legal stance regarding marijuana distribution, possession, and use.

As a result, recent attempts to decriminalize or legalize marijuana in Texas have met with fairly stiff resistance. As far as pot fans are concerned, though, the situation is improving.