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how deep do you plant a cannabis seed

Some cannabis growers may fill the cup about halfway before planting the young seedling. Adding more can be beneficial for the root system. Continue putting soil in the pot until you reach about 1 cm below the edge of the container. You can press the growing medium down lightly, but do not compact it. When you have the amount you need, you can move to the next step.

Some growers use the damp paper towel method for the germination process. Sometimes, the newly-formed root of the seed can get stuck to the paper towel. The first instinct is to pull it loose carefully, but the action could potentially damage the plant. Instead, spray it with some water to encourage the root to let go of the paper towel.

Step 1 — Fill a Pot or Cup With Potting Soil

After you are done filling the pot with soil, make a small hole for the germinated cannabis seed. Since the seedling is tiny, a clean pen or pencil can make the dimple the appropriate size. Place the writing tool on top of the soil and push it down to create the dimple. The depth of a hole matters for the growth of a weed seed.

You have finished germinating your weed seeds, and it is now time to begin planting them. Planting weed seeds involves moving a seedling from a paper towel or small container to a larger pot. There are a few items you will need and tips to keep in mind.

Try not to cover the pots with plastic or create a humidity dome over them. Air needs to pass through easily, and a buildup of humidity may damage the plant. Besides avoiding the wrong soil, make sure it is not too wet or too dry. Whenever you water the seedling, make sure it does not have the wrong pH level.

Timescales can vary, as it all depends on how ideal your germination environment is (see the golden rules above). Even the worst grower could make a seed germinate, but it may take a few weeks and, of course, increases the risk of a weaker plant.

Before you can be met with bountiful hauls of dank buds, there are several stages of cannabis growing that take precedence. Unless you can successfully germinate cannabis seeds, you won’t have a plant to harvest. Give your seeds the best possible start in life by reading our definitive guide to germination.

WHAT IS AN EXPECTED GERMINATION TIME?

Maintaining the ideal temperature (between 22–25°C/71–77°F) and moisture for germination is tricky. Leaving seeds out in the open environment or on a windowsill is far from ideal; a DIY climate-controlled cupboard would do a much better service. A warming mat is perfect for maintaining a constant temperature, but it doesn’t tackle the issue of moisture.

The dome of the plastic container will create your seeds’ own mini tropical climate. If you then place all the components in a temperature-controlled cupboard, you will have created a self-perpetuating supply of moisture—no need to touch the seeds again until they are ready to be transferred to your final growing medium as a young seedling. Using the stone wool block method, your seeds should germinate in one to two days.

Two or three weeks after germination, your young seedlings should be ready for their new home. At this point you have two options; transplanting them into soil pots, or taking on the challenge of hydroponics. You’ll know when the seedlings are ready to be moved because the root system should start to poke out of the bottom of the wool blocks. As long as the roots haven’t begun to engulf the bottom half of the wool block, they will seek out water and nutrients in their new surroundings and continue to grow downwards.

To obtain much better results, first germinate seeds in kitchen paper, jiffy pellets or peat plugs used for rooting cuttings and then transplant them to the soil or to a pot once the small seedlings have been born. Another benefit of this method is that we can germinate a large number of seeds in a very small space, such as a small greenhouse, which will make it much easier to provide the correct temperature and humidity.

Although the germination of cannabis seeds is a relatively quick and easy process, it is crucial to take into account a series of important factors in order to obtain as high a germination rate as possible. In addition, it’s in our interest that the seeds germinate as quickly as possible, and especially if we want to avoid problems like fungal infection or a low germination rate.

Direct germination in soil

In addition, the scarce space between the plants will also mean they will compete for available light, something not recommended if we want to get the most out of each plant. The plants will produce very little lateral branching, and will center their growth on a weak main stem, with too long an internodal distance, factors that usually affects negatively on the final yield of buds.

Sean 2021-05-17
I had my seeds in the paper towel for 3 days. The tap-roots appeared(not out just showing a bit) and I planted them in the soil. 3 days have past and I haven't seen any progress. Is there a reason why this is happening?

Tim 2021-05-17
Hi Sean, thanks for your comment. As long as the soil is neither too wet nor too dry, there shouldn’t be a problem with the seeds. They can take a few days to pop their heads up above the surface once they’re planted, the root needs to work its way downwards and find a solid hold to be able to push the seed head out of the soil. Speaking from personal experience, don’t be tempted to dig around looking for them as you’ll probably do more damage than good. The only times that seeds didn’t come up for me were the times I overwatered them, it’s crucial that they get enough air at this moment and too much water can lead to them rotting quickly. Of course, if they totally dry out then they’re not going to survive either. At this stage, I’d just recommend patience, good luck! Best wishes!