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male and female seeds

The second way is to mishandle a regular strain and create stress for it. Basically, even the most robust strains will start to hermy if you subject them to mistreatment, including “killing with kindness”, for example by overfeeding or over-watering.

Hermaphrodite cannabis plants are a complicated topic, however, the key point to note is that for practical purposes, hermies should be treated as males, which means they need to be identified and removed quickly from a growing area to make sure they do not pollinate females.

Female cannabis plants are the ones with all the cannabinoid goodness

Over the short term, however, it will be entirely down to luck how many of each sex you get. If you’re luck’s good, you could get all females, if it’s bad you could get all males.

This is a slight overstatement; males do have some cannabinoid (CBD and THC) content, but frankly not enough to justify the effort it takes to grow them, especially not given the risk that they will pollinate your productive females.

Male cannabis plants exist to pollinate females and that’s basically it.

Female pre-flowers also develop at the nodes. You can distinguish them based on one obvious visual characteristic: hairs. Female pre-flowers feature tear-drop shaped calyxes with small hairs protruding from the tip. These small hairs, known as pistils, are the sex organs of female cannabis flowers.

To avoid this issue, try to maintain a stable environment in your grow room. Use a thermo-hygrometer to monitor temperature and humidity, keep your light schedule strict, and ensure your plants get all the nutrients they require.

See, the vast majority of plant species are monoecious, a term meaning they possess both male and female reproductive organs. These include edible plants, such as corn and squashes, that can readily fertilise their own flowers using their own pollen.

IDENTIFYING FEMALE CANNABIS PLANTS

A guide to differentiating between male, female, and hermaphrodite cannabis plants.

Female cannabis plants are the main focus of casual growers looking to harvest a personal stash. But, depending on their genetics, female plants can look drastically different from one another. Some remain small, producing dense canopies and significant lateral growth. Others grow in excess of 3m, produce massive harvests, and look more like trees than regular garden plants.

It should also be noted that male pollen sacs and female flowers develop at the same point on the plant. Both structures emerge from nodes, the point at which branches meet the main stem. So, when you see buds starting to form on some plants, start looking for pollen sacs too.

Male plants, in contrast, don’t produce flowers. This makes them less valuable for growers seeking only buds. However, they do produce pollen sacs. These small vessels create the genetic material required to fertilise female flowers and create hybrids. This makes the males extremely important for breeding new cannabis strains.

When female weed seeds or plants start to flower, hairs develop in abundance at the ends of their ramifications. This is not present in male weed seeds or plants. Female weed seeds or plants also develop V-shaped pistils at their flowering stage.

They can pollinate themselves as well as the other female weed plants. They tend to pass on their sexual dispositions to their offspring so they are best eradicated. The sex of weed plants can be affected by many factors. Environmental conditions, weed seed age, lunar stages, and chemicals are known to influence the sex of the plants.

Female marijuana weed plants that have not been pollinated are called “sinsemilla” or “without seeds.” The flowers are allowed to grow and develop to produce the psychoactive chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

Plants, like animals, have male and female varieties. The male plants produce pollen which pollinates the flowers of female plants. Flowers that have been pollinated produce seeds. Marijuana, or weed plants, are also either male or female.

The sex of the male weed seeds or plants can be determined three weeks before the female weed seeds or plants which are planted at the same time. This is convenient since male weed seeds or plants must be harvested before they can pollinate the female seeds or plants and block their growth.

Male weed seeds or plants grow vertically and do not have as many branches and leaves as the female weed seeds or plants. This causes them to look frail and unhealthy. Instead of flowers they develop small buds that look like balls. These characteristic abnormal growths usually appear between the third and fourth internodes of the main stem of the plant. This is manifested at the start of the development of a male weed seed or plant’s sexual identity.

Some weed seeds also develop the sexual organs of the opposite sex. These are called hermaphrodites or “hermies.” Hermaphrodite female weed seeds develop staminate flowers or flowers that have stamens instead of pistils.